Why Hire a Drug Possession Lawyer in Defiance, Ohio

In many states, a person convicted of possessing, trafficking, or distribution of any drug, whether cocaine, crack, marijuana, crystal meth, heroin, ecstasy, PCP, LSD or any other acid, will see their driver’s license revoked for a number of years. However, that is only the beginning of a person’s problem if they are caught with drugs.

There are a number of penalties, and the larger the amount of drugs being trafficked, distributed or sold, the greater the penalty. For example, if a person has more than 20 grams of marijuana or a rock of crack, the potential sentence is five years in prison plus court costs and fines. If the amount is higher, you could be charged with a first-degree felony, and that carries a potential sentence of up to 30 years in prison and a fine of $10,000. Of course, this varies from state to state, so it is best to hire a Drug Possession Lawyer in Defiance Ohio.

Mandatory minimum prison sentences will probably be imposed. For drug crimes, there are mandatory minimum prison sentences. For example, if you are accused of trafficking more than 200 grams of cocaine, there is a mandatory minimum sentence of seven years in prison. Drug trafficking too could take a life sentence plus a fine of $500,000.

Drug treatment instead of prison is also an option. Going to a drug treatment facility is a better resolution for the client and the government. When you reach an agreement to replace incarceration for drug treatment, counselors work to help you recover. It is important that you hire a Drug Possession Lawyer in Defiance Ohio, that represents people charged with drug crimes pertaining to:

1. Cocaine

2. Marijuana

3. Meth

4. Crack

5. Crystal Meth

6. Methamphetamines

7. Heroin

8. LCD

9. Mushrooms

10. PCP

11. Prescription drugs

Defense in these types of cases is a must if you are arrested. You want an attorney that has successfully defended people against drug crimes. This may be based on whether federal agents or police violated constitutional rights. As a rule, any federal or local police officer cannot enter your residence or hotel room without showing a warrant. Violating this rule could lead to the charges against being thrown out. In this case, an immediate intervention of counsel will be a key to achieving the reduction of the charges and to possible disposal. Call James E. Hitchcock for more information. You can also visit their Google+ page for more information.

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